nom-food:

Garlic parmesan fries

nom-food:

Garlic parmesan fries

(via ethiopienne)

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.
And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.
So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3

!!!!!
NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!
This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”
All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)
Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.

And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.

So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3


!!!!!

NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!

This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”

All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)

Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

(via hueva-york)

cowbowies:

Are you trying to tell me the original Pokémon were NOT inspired by these ancient Taíno Zemí sculptures?

(via hueva-york)

(Source: fuckyeahfamousblackgirls, via hueva-york)

annethecatdetective:

burning-high-rise:

whorishgreen:

whorishgreen:

I’ve never been more emotional about any social media post in my entire life

UPDATE: guys Beth Broderick tweeted yesterday that this Salem is THE SAME SALEM!!! He’s 20 years old man!!!! 20!

That Salem is still kicking is all I care about.

(via chulaquiles)

arienreign:

Why isn’t anyone talking about this?
http://www.dailydot.com/news/darrien-hunt-shot-by-police-while-cosplaying/

(via commiekinkshamer)

banditblossom:

jsyk, only 2.9% of the population in Canada is black, and yet black Canadians makes 80% of prisons and are mostly likely to get mistreated in them

tell me again racism doesn’t exist Canada. (: 

(via mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers)

"Black art is not a free for all.
Black art is not a free for all.
Black art is not free for all.
It is free for none of y’all non-Black people. It is created for Black people to get their lives, to recover their wits, to see themselves and their stories reflected, and to be healed and uplifted. Black people need this. When we come home from surviving in the world where we are made to be small and hopeless, we need our Black magic. We need it to heal us from the daily soul wounds we are exposed to—from the humiliating assumptions and character assassinations to the public executions. Black art gives us back our dignity, re-affirms our right to exist, raises a voice and words to our anger, hurt, and frustration. Black art is our only potable water, our healing balm."

Nadijah Robinson, “Black Art is Not A Free For All (via ethiopienne)

(Source: y2kalypse, via ethiopienne)

(Source: marie-madeleinehasablog, via ilianation)

escrito-en-mi-alma:

officialunitedstates:

officialmexico:

texas

no you can’t have it back stop asking

-_____-
Bola de pendejos.

(via uarhi)

uarhi:

tastefullyoffensive:

[junkeez]

Me too

(Source: ghostlytreats, via ladypandacat)

cupcakes-n-candy:

strangelfreak:

"I’m fed up to the ears with old men dreaming up wars for young men to die in."

Exactly

cupcakes-n-candy:

strangelfreak:

"I’m fed up to the ears with old men dreaming up wars for young men to die in."

Exactly

(via the-goddamazon)

"The meeting of two personalities is like the contact of two chemical substances: if there is any reaction, both are transformed."

C.G. Jung (via feellng)

(via mai-morning-after)

problackgirl:

we’ve taught girls to romanticise nearly everything a boy does. when i was younger i thought it was cute that boys chased the girl even after she said no. i loved it when after a girl moved away from a kiss, the guy would pull her back and force it on. i thought a guy saying ‘i won’t take a no for an answer’ was passionate and romantic. we’re literally always teaching girls to romanticise abusive traits.

(via ladypandacat)